International Women's Day

women's day 2020
A message from Dr. Vesna Skul:
 
I personally feel blessed for having had so many brilliant women in my life: from the role models like my brilliant grandmothers and my recently departed Mama, mentors and dear friends who make up for the sisters I never had to my dear daughter, soon to have a daughter of her own.  
 
As women, we fulfill so many roles, yet we still need to achieve recognition for all we do.  
 
"An equal world is an enabled world" - and every one of us can do our bit to bring about gender equality.
 
That is the core message of #EachForEqual, the campaign at the center of this year’s International Women’s Day. It seeks to draw attention to the idea that gender inequality isn’t a women’s issue, but an economic one – as gender equality is essential for economies and communities to thrive.
 
The campaign has become a symbol of the movement, which extends far beyond March 8, with activities running all year long. The idea is to reinforce and galvanize collective action, holding events and talks that urge us all to share responsibility and play our part.
 
The campaign highlights six key areas:
1. Championing women forging tech innovation
2. Applauding equality for women athletes
3. Forging inclusive workplaces so women thrive
4. Supporting women to earn on their own terms
5. Empowering women through health education
6. ​Increasing visibility for female creatives
 
As the campaign highlights, forging equality in these areas is crucial to a “healthier, wealthier and more harmonious” world.
 
Physicians and staff at the Comprehensive Center for Women’s Medicine celebrate our women patients (and the supportive males in their lives) by teaching them self sustainability when it comes to their health and the health of their families’. It is well recognized that women are primary decision makers about the family’s healthcare choices. However, in their quest to nurture others they often forget their own health needs. We urge all of our women patients to take inventory of their own physical and emotional health and allow us to help them get to their personal best, so they can continue to be of service to their global community.  
 
This Women's Day, we want all of our patients to know that they are special, unique and appreciated and thank them for being part of the Comprehensive Center for Women’s Medicine community. 
 
Happy Women's Day 2020! Make it a memorable year!
Author
Dr. Vesna Skul Dr. Skul is a graduate of Rush Medical College in Chicago, is a board-certified specialist in Internal Medicine, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Rush University. She is also fellowship-trained and board-certified in anti-aging and regenerative medicine. Her career has been devoted to caring for women in all phases of their lives.

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