Do you find our website to be helpful?
Yes   No

5 Spices that will Keep you Warm during these Cold Months

Spices are the delightfully aromatic plants whose warming scents are a characteristic element of the winter season. Many spices contain similar essential oils but in different proportions. These oils are released through the physical process of grinding, grating or crushing. Here are some spices to try at home.

1.) Allspice: Allspice (Pimenta dioica) comes from the dried berries of a tree native to Jamaica, Mexico and Central America. Allspice is a digestive and carminative due to the volatile oil, eugenol. Similar to other spices containing the oil, allspice also has anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

2.) Cinnamon: is harvested from the inner bark of several trees of the genus Cinnamomum, native to India. Cinnamon’s characteristic taste and smell is due to its primary constituent, cinnamaldehyde, an essential oil. Rich in antioxidants, cinnamon helps reduce free radicals, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties, aids in stabilizing lipids and blood sugar, and may have beneficial effects on neurogenerative diseases.

3.) Cloves: Commonly used in traditional Indian dishes, clove’s strong, pungent flavor can sometimes overpower other flavors and should be used sparingly. The spice has been used in respiratory conditions, as an expectorant for coughs and to sooth sore throats. Clove is also a rich source of antioxidants supporting the immune system.

4.) Ginger: Ginger is a good source of vitamin C and minerals including magnesium, copper and manganese. Medicinally, ginger was used for digestive ailments and is known for its calming, carminative effect. Due to its ability to stimulate saliva flow, ginger has been studied as an antiemetic, alleviating motion sickness and morning sickness, and reducing the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Ginger is a plant whose root or rhizome is commonly used cooking as well as in medicine.

5.) Nutmeg: has a special affinity for use in dairy dishes such as custard or pudding, but also in soups and other desserts. Historically this seed was used for stomach ailments, headaches and fevers. A high-mineral spice, nutmeg is a source of manganese, copper and magnesium in beneficial amounts.

From adding a little nutmeg into your morning bowl of oatmeal, or spicing up your dinner with ginger, these spices will keep you warm all winter long.

You Might Also Enjoy...

How to Cope with Stress Amidst a Pandemic

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and the community you live in. Here are some helpful tips on how to cope with stress.

Now Offering Telemedicine Appointments amid COVID-19

Amid the crisis surrounding the pandemic of Covid-19, we hope to provide reassurance and well thought out advice that is not emotional but is science based and predicated by World Health, CDC and local health authorities.

International Women's Day

An uplifting message to broaden the scope to empower, champion, support, applaud, and lift each other up as women, this Women's Day. As women, we fulfill so many roles, yet we still need to achieve recognition for all we do. Happy Women's Day 2020!

20 Health Tips for 2020

With the New Year already underway, let’s examine twenty simple, healthy behaviors or choices we can start practicing now that will benefit us physically, emotionally and have lasting effects on our lives. Let's dominate not only 2020, but years to follow.